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News & FAQ  >  Moving Tips  >  How To Move Out Of Your Share House Amicably

How To Move Out Of Your Share House Amicably

Whether you’re moving out individually or as a household, leaving a share house is often a time of stress and unnecessary conflict - even for the best of friends. In an ideal world, everyone would agree on what it means to uphold ‘good housemate conduct’, however, in reality, all you can really do is communicate and do the right thing yourself, and hope that others will too.

With that in mind, we’ve put together a few basic ways you can contribute to moving out of your share house as amicably as possible.   

GIVE APPROPRIATE NOTICE

This one seems obvious… to most. But it’s surprising how many people think that “hey, so I’m moving out this weekend” is appropriate. Ideally, you would have mutually agreed on a notice period when you first moved in. But if you didn’t, somewhere between 2-4 weeks is usually the norm, depending on the circumstances and whether or not you’re an official leaseholder. Tenants Victoria have published some good resources for co-tenants which cover everything from lease issues to sub-tenancies. 

PACK YOUR STUFF LIKE A PRO

We get it. You’re busy juggling work, study, life etc. But don’t be ‘that person’ who takes forever to pack, leaving the other housemates worrying about whether or not you’re going to get your gear out on time. Get organised early – have you got moving boxes? Packing tape? Help or a removalist booked in? Make a list and get on it. The quicker you get it done, the sooner you can move into your new pad and the less stressful it will be for all. 

DON’T LEAVE TRACES OF YOURSELF BEHIND

As much as your legacy will no doubt live on (#goodtimes), there is nothing worse than a share house accumulating unwanted clutter in the form of remnants of former housemates. Unless they are genuinely keen on keeping your beloved memorabilia, then don’t leave it behind.

USE THIS TIME TO RE-EVALUATE YOUR POSSESSIONS

Speaking of stuff, moving houses is a good time to re-think what you own and cull and/or donate wherever possible. Countless studies have shown that there are benefits to your mental health having less clutter and unnecessary possessions in your life. Not only that but the less stuff you have, the easier it is to move. 

NOBODY LIKES A GRUB. PICK UP THE VACUUM

Whether you’re all ending the lease collectively, or you’re just moving out of your room, make sure you put in your fair share of the cleaning. If your housemates are staying on and it’s just you moving out, then give your room a good vacuum and dust and leave it as you’d like to find it. This is textbook ‘adulting’ and just good courtesy.

PAY UP PROMPTLY

If you agree to pay rent and bills by a particular date, then make sure you honour that or communicate in advance otherwise. For your sake, it’s always good to keep some kind of record of what you paid out and when especially if there are multiple housemates paying several utilities.

BE THE BIGGER PERSON IF NEED BE

Some of your former housemates will become lifelong friends. And some you will hope to never have to see again. The realities of trying to co-exist under the same roof with a multitude of personalities and values can turn out beautifully or lead to unfortunate conflict. Whatever the situation, if there are calls for you to be the more mature person, then do so.

At the end of the day if you walk away from a share house knowing you’ve done the right thing by all then you can hold your head up high. And surely there is some kind of housemate’s karma system whereby the way you treat people comes back your way, right? Regardless, keep it positive and dignified.

WHERE TO GET ADVICE

Tenants Union of Victoria
9416 2577
www.tuv.org.au

Residential Tenancies Bond Authority
1300 137 164
www.rtba.vic.gov.au